Quote of the day

I think I was the best baseball player I ever saw.

~Willie Mays

 

willie_mays_p8-696x392

breaking911.com

 


Quote of the day

In order to excel, you must be completely dedicated to your chosen sport. You must also be prepared to work hard and be willing to accept constructive criticism. Without one-hundred percent dedication, you won’t be able to do this.

~Willie Mays

1952_topps_261_willie_mays_d6021576g

Topps


This day in baseball: Player of the sixties

On January 17, 1970, Willie Mays was named Player of the Decade for the 1960s by the Sporting News. During the ten-year span, Mays batted .300 and averaged 100 RBIs and 35 home runs per season with the Giants.

willie-mays

1966 Topps


“Clothespins,” by Stuart Dybek

I like how this piece captures the imagination surrounding baseball in children.  And I love the detail — I can just visualize a boy with a bat, tossing up clothespins to swing at, the occasional clothespin bursting apart in midair.  This piece was originally published in Brass Knuckles in 1979.

*

I once hit clothespins
for the Chicago Cubs.
I’d go out after supper
when the wash was in
and collect clothespins
from under four stories
of clothesline.
A swing-and-a-miss
was a strike-out;
the garage roof, Willie Mays,
pounding his mitt
under a pop fly.
Bushes, a double,
off the fence, triple,
and over, home run.
The bleachers roared.
I was all they ever needed for the flag.
New records every game—
once, 10 homers in a row!
But sometimes I’d tag them
so hard they’d explode,
legs flying apart in midair,
pieces spinning crazily
in all directions.
Foul Ball! What else
could I call it?
The bat was real.


‘Mickey and Willie,’ by Allen Barra

For the last few weeks, I spent my commutes to and from work, as well as my time in the car running errands and driving back and forth to Kansas City, listening to an audiobook: Mickey and Willie: Mantle and Mays, the Parallel Lives of Baseball’s Golden Age by Allen Barra.  For some reason, it never occurred to me to consider the two men simultaneously.  I suppose that it didn’t fully click that they played Major League Baseball at the same time (funny how clueless I can be about something that I usually feel I know so well!).  But I am glad to have come across this biographical study of how the lives and careers of Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays paralleled each other in so many ways.Mickey and Willie

In spite of the fact that their backgrounds differed so greatly, Mantle and Mays were virtually the same age, practically the same size (though Mantle was slightly bigger), and they both arrived in New York at the same time.  Both played center field and both had close relationships with their dominant fathers as they grew up in the South.

They even paralleled one another in the ways that they differed.  Mantle was white, Mays was black.  Mickey drank heavily, while Willie couldn’t stand alcohol.  Mickey stayed married to one woman, but was a notorious womanizer.  Meanwhile, Willie Mays married twice, but if there were any extramarital affairs, he kept them private.

The biggest thing these men shared in common was their celebrity and the expectations that came with that fame.  Both players experienced the fickleness of celebrity, being cheered one moment and booed in the next.  Each had a song written about him (“Say Hey (The Willie Mays Song)” and “I Love Mickey”).  When Mantle was rejected for military service, fans turned on him for being a draft dodger.  When the Giants moved from New York to San Francisco, Willie Mays was booed for not being Joe DiMaggio and, likely, for being black.

The question of who was the better player comes up frequently in the book.  The answer Barra seems to hint at appears to indicate that it was Willie Mays, though Mickey Mantle would’ve had the title if only he would have taken better care of himself.  Mantle himself publicly conceded that Mays was the better player.  Mays, evidently the more prideful of the two, hated the idea of anyone being considered better than himself.

Barra puts his own personal touch into the book as well.  He discusses his own idolization of Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays.  He even admits that, the older he became and the more he learned about the two ballplayers, the more disillusioned he became.  Even in spite of this, he continued to admire them, accepting the fact that, in spite of their greatness on the diamond, Mantle and Mays were only men, after all.

All in all, I found this book a worthwhile read (or, in my case, a worthwhile listen).  The reader gets biographies of two players simultaneously, and it is done in a fashion that presents a perspective not usually found in biographies.


This day in baseball

Having already been the youngest player to hit 50 home runs in a season, accomplished in 1955, Willie Mays also became the oldest player to accomplish the feat on September 25, 1965.  Mays was 34 years old when he hit number 50 that year and would finish the season with 52.

Baseball Digest 1954

Baseball Digest 1954


Toni Stone: The first woman to play in the Negro Leagues

Major League Baseball has yet to see its first woman player, but the Negro Leagues were ahead of the times in this regard.  Three women played professional baseball in the Negro Baseball Leagues, the first of whom was one Toni “Tomboy” Stone.

Toni Stone (Biography.com)

Toni Stone (Biography.com)

Born Marcenia Lyle on July 17, 1921, in St. Paul, Minnesota, Toni Stone signed to play second base for the Indianapolis Clowns in 1953.  It was a path that went against the hopes and dreams that Stone’s parents had for her and her siblings.  From a young age, Toni Stone loved competition, and she excelled at a variety of sports as she grew up, including baseball, track, and ice skating.  Her parents, who would have preferred that she focus more of her attention on her schoolwork, went so far as to set up a meeting for her with the local priest to try to talk her out of baseball, but by the end of that meeting, the priest had invited her to join his team in the Catholic Midget League.

By the age of fifteen, Stone had joined the Twin City Colored Giants, a traveling men’s baseball team.  In the 1940s, however, she moved to San Francisco to help a sick sister, taking a brief hiatus from baseball.  But then in 1949, she joined the San Francisco Sea Lions of the West Coast Negro Baseball League.  In her first plate appearance with the Sea Lions, Stone earned two RBIs.

Being a black woman playing on a men’s team in Jim Crow America, Stone’s experiences playing ball weren’t always fun, of course.  She often dealt with a barrage of jeers and insults from fans and players alike.  Stone was quite proud of the fact that the male players were out to get her, however, wearing it as a sort of badge of honor.  At one point, she said, “They didn’t mean any harm, and in their way they liked me. Just that I wasn’t supposed to be there. They’d tell me to go home and fix my husband some biscuits, or any damn thing. Just get the hell away from here.”  As a woman, Stone was not allowed into the men’s locker room, but if she was lucky, she was sometimes permitted to change in the umpires’ locker room.  In spite of the hardships, she took advantage of the exposure that she gained playing with the Sea Lions, and in 1953, the Indianapolis Clowns signed Toni Stone to its roster.

Stone appeared in 50 games that year.  She hit .243, including getting a hit off the legendary pitcher, Satchel Paige.  She also had the opportunity to play with the likes of Willie Mays and Ernie Banks.  Stone’s time with the Clowns did not last, however, and in the off-season, she was traded to the Kansas City Monarchs.  She retired at the end of her season with the Monarchs, however, due to age and a lack of playing time.  Stone had compiled a .240 career batting average.

In 1985 Stone was inducted into the Women’s Sports Foundation’s International Women’s Sports Hall of Fame. Then, in 1993, Stone was inducted into the Women’s Sports Hall of Fame and into the Sudafed International Women’s Sports Hall of Fame.  Toni Stone died of heart failure in 1996.

Middlebury Magazine

Middlebury Magazine