This day in baseball: Rookie no-hitter

On August 31, 1935, 28-year-old rookie Vern Kennedy became the sixth rookie in major league history to throw a no-hitter.  The White Sox pitcher dominated the Indians en route to a 5-0 victory at Comiskey Park.  Helping his own cause, Kennedy also managed to stroke a three-run triple in the contest.

Vern_Kennedy

BaseballLibrary.com


“Take Me Out to the Ballgame,” performed by Julien Neel

This is pretty incredible.  Julien Neel created essentially a one-man barbershop quartet, performing all four voices of the quartet with the help of some basic recording equipment.  Here he performs an impressive rendition of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame.”


Jokes to kick off the week

Because Monday mornings are rough, and I’m due to post a few more of these.  Enjoy!

~*~

Manager: Our new infielder cost $10 million. I call him our “Wonder Player.”
Fan: Why’s that?
Manager: Every time he plays, I wonder why I bothered to get him.

*

According to the Chicago Tribune, the following statistic was given in the press notes for the June 7 Chicago-Oakland game:

The Oakland Athletics are 32-0 in games in which they have scored more runs than their opponents.

*

Dentist: Would you help me out? I’d like you to give a few of your loudest screams.

Patient: Why, Doc? It isn’t all that bad this time.

Dentist: Well, there are about twenty people in the waiting room right now, and I don’t want to miss the five o’clock Braves game on Channel Four.


Quote of the day

Baseball is something more than a game to an American boy; it is his training field for life work. Destroy his faith in its squareness and honesty and you have destroyed something more; you have planted suspicion of all things in his heart.

~Kenesaw Mountain Landis

Landis_portrait-restored

National Baseball Hall of Fame Library


Kurkjian interview

The Huffington Post published this interview with Tim Kurkjian a couple days ago, which I found an interesting read.  The interview was initiated as a result of the publication of his latest book, I’m Fascinated By Sacrifice Flies – Inside The Game We All Love.  I’ve not read the book, nor do I have cable television to watch ESPN, so I’m kurkjian book.jpgafraid I can’t speak to Kurkjian himself nor my impressions of him.  But I did enjoy reading this interview.

He discusses the skill level involved in baseball as compared to other sports and the declining popularity of Major League Baseball as compared to the NFL or NASCAR.  I particularly love how he advocates against parents and coaches pushing their kids to specialize in a single sport, bemoaning the decline of three-sport letter winners in high schools.  He points out that “when we have 14 year old kids having Tommy John surgery, then something is really wrong with this picture.”  I often think the same kind of thing when the Little League World Series comes on, wondering about the futures these kids have given the stress they put themselves through so young.

Most of all, I just love the fact that Kurkjian’s love for baseball shows through so clearly in this interview.  People who have a passion for this game — as many of you reading this have — absolutely fascinate me.  And I enjoy reading and hearing about the reasons people love it so much.

Read the interview here.


1930s baseball cartoon

This is fun: a baseball cartoon, presumably from the 1930s.  I can’t speak to the validity of the posted time period, but it certainly looks like an old bit of animation, for sure.


This day in baseball

On August 22, 1917, Pirates’ outfielder Carson Bigbee set a major league record with eleven at-bats in a single game as the Pirates and Dodgers squared off for twenty-two innings.  It is a record that has since been tied by thirteen others, but never broken.

1916_Carson_Bigbee

Carson Bigbee as a member of the Tacoma Tigers, 1916 (The Sporting News)