“The Call,” by Charles Ghigna

The author, Charles Ghigna, was kind enough to send this piece my way a while back.  It’s one of those ‘what if’ types of pieces that we can all relate to on some level.  I’m impressed that he managed to garner an invitation to spring training to try out; it’s a shame it didn’t work out for him.

*
Like many kids of the 1950s, I loved baseball.
I played on teams throughout my youth and in 1964
I received an invitation to spring training camp
for a tryout with the Pittsburgh Pirates.
I’m still waiting to hear from them.
In the meantime, I’ve been writing a few poems…

I may have lost a step or two,
(Or four, or six, or eight).
My bat speed may have slowed a bit,
(Much like a rusty gate).

My fastball may have lost some pop,
My slider may have slid,
But when I dream of baseball,
I become a kid.

A glint of steel in my young stare,
Swagger in my stride,
I saunter to the plate
With confidence and pride.

A fastball down the middle,
I swing with all my might,
Old Rawlings soars past the crowd
And deep into the night.

There I am in summer’s glow
Warmed by hometown cheers,
Rounding third and striding home,
Back to my boyhood years.

Suddenly I’m sixty-nine
Asleep in winter’s sun,
Dreaming of what might have been
When I was twenty-one.

Still I wait to take the call,
To hear them say my name,
An old man dreaming of the day
He played a young man’s game.

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4 Comments on ““The Call,” by Charles Ghigna”

  1. wkkortas says:

    Ah, the fastball is by us, but rarely is the tinge of regret so eloquently expressed.

  2. Thanks so much, Precious! Always enjoy your posts!

    My son and I attended a Birmingham Barons game last week in their new downtown stadium. Minor league baseball at its finest! We’re lucky to live here in Alabama near one of the oldest ball parks in the nation (Rickwood Field) and this new gem of a stadium known as Regions Field.

    Cheers!
    Charles

    http://www.FatherGoose.com


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